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Recent News


March 15, 2012
Jobs On The Way: U.S.-Korea Trade Agreement Enters Into Force

 

February 21, 2012
United States, Korea Set Date for Entry Into Force of U.S.-Korea Trade Agreement

 

February 18, 2012
Update on Implementation of the U.S.-Korea Trade Agreement

 

January 25, 2012
Update on Implementation of Trade Agreements with Korea, Colombia, and Panama

 

January 6, 2012
Update on Implementation of Trade Agreements with Korea, Colombia, and Panama

 

December 19, 2011
Update on Implementation of Trade Agreements with Korea, Colombia, and Panama

 

December 5, 2011
Update on Implementation of Free Trade Agreements with Korea, Colombia, and Panama

 

October 21, 2011:
Statement By U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk On Presidential Signature Of Trade Legislation

 

October 13, 2011
BLOG: Statements Regarding the Congressional Approval of the Korea, Colombia, and Panama Trade Agreements

 

 

FACT SHEET: From Enactment To Entry Into Force: Next Steps On The Trade Agreements

 

October 12, 2011:
Statement By U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk On Congressional Passage Of Trade Agreements, Trade Adjustment Assistance And Key Preference Programs

 

October 3, 2011
U.S Trade Representative Ron Kirk Calls for Swift Passage of Trade Agreements 

 

 

August 3,2011:
Kirk Comment on Pending Trade Agreements, Trade Adjustment Assistance 

 

July 7, 2011:
USTR Kirk Comments Following Trade Markups In Senate Finance, House Ways and Means Committees

  

July 5, 2011:
Statement from USTR Kirk Regarding Announcement of House Ways & Means Committee Markup

 

June 30, 2011:
Ambassador Kirk Statement Regarding the Planned Informal Markup in The Senate Finance Committee

 

June 29, 2011:
INFO: Links on Pending Trade Agreements, TAA, Preference Programs

 

June 28, 2011:
U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk Welcomes Next Steps on Pending Trade Pacts, Trade Adjustment Assistance

 

April 7, 2011:
Statement by Ambassador Demetrios Marantis before the House Ways and Means Subcommittee on Trade

 

February 10, 2011:
Signed Legal Texts Related to the U.S.-South Korea Trade Agreement 

 

December 3, 2011:
Statement by the President Announcing the U.S.-South Korea Trade Agreement  

 

Important U.S.-South Korea Links


Port of MiamiBenefits for Your Industry: USTR Fact Sheets

This Agreement would eliminate tariffs on over 95 percent of industrial and consumer goods within five years. It will promote the further integration of the U.S. and South Korean economies and enhance the competitiveness of U.S. businesses in the world’s 12th largest economy. Visit USTR's Fact Sheet page to find out how the agreement will specifically benefit your sector.

 

Tractor in a fieldBenefits for Your Farm: Agriculture Fact Sheets

The United States is already South Korea’s top supplier of agriculture products, including of a broad variety of farm products such as almonds, fresh cherries, hides and skins and corn. The U.S.-South Korea trade agreement creates new opportunities for U.S. farmers, ranchers and food processors seeking to export to South Korea’s 49 million consumers, giving American agricultural producers more market access in two ways – by getting rid of tariffs charged when U.S. exports come into South Korea, and by laying out a framework to tackle other barriers to U.S. exports –even those that might arise in the future. Visit the Department of Agriculture's website to find out how the agreement will benefit your sector.

 

Manufacturing PlantBenefits for Your Sector: Industry Fact Sheets: Benefits for Your Sector

The U.S-South Korea trade agreement creates new opportunities for U.S. manufacturers seeking to export to South Korea in two ways: first, it eliminates tariffs, or duties, charged when U.S. exports come into South Korea; and it addresses non-tariff barriers to U.S. exports – whether by eliminating barriers that are in place today, or by establishing a framework to prevent non-tariff barriers from arising in the future. Visit the Department of Commerce's website to find out how the agreement will benefit your sector.  

 

AgreementFull Text of the Agreement

Read the full text of the U.S.-South Korea trade agreement, which is an integral part of the President’s efforts to increase opportunities for U.S. businesses, farmers and workers through improved access for their products and services in foreign markets, and supports the President’s National Export Initiative goal of doubling of U.S. exports in 5 years. You can find the Legal Texts reflecting December 3, 2010 Agreement here. You can also find an updated text of the South Korean-language version of the U.S.-South Korea trade agreement here.

Support for the U.S.-South Korea Trade Agreement

Statements of support for the U.S.-South Korea Trade Agreement from various elected officials, the business community, and advocacy groups can be found below.

 

Visit Your Government Trade Partners

Visit USTR's partners across the federal government to learn more about their part in the trade agreement.

Department of Agriculture Seal     Department of Agriculture

Commerce Seal     Commerce Department

Labor Department Seal     Department of Labor

OMB Seal     Office of Management and Budget

Export Import Bank Seal      Export-Import Bank

SBA Seal      Small Business Administration

OPIC Seal      Overseas Private Investment Corp.

USTDA Seal      Trade and Development Agency

State Department Seal      State Department

Intellectual Property Rights in the U.S.-South Korea Trade Agreement

Copyright IconThe Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Chapter of the U.S.-South Korea trade agreement contains state-of-the-art protections spanning all types of intellectual property, and requirements to join key multilateral IPR agreements. It also contains strong enforcement provisions to ensure that American intellectual property rights are efficiently and effectively protected in South Korea.

KEY ELEMENTS

  • Protection for Copyrighted Works in a Digital Economy: The agreement provides for several forms of IPR protection that are important in the digital environment, such as anti-circumvention provisions to prohibit tampering with technologies designed to prevent piracy and unauthorized distribution over the Internet; a framework for the limitation of liability of Internet Service Providers (ISPs) for copyright infringement, reflecting the balance struck in the U.S. Digital Millennium Copyright Act between allowing for legitimate ISP activity and preventing the infringement of copyright; and enhancing the rights of copyright owners over digital copies of their works. The Agreement extends the terms of protection for copyrighted works, including phonograms, consistent with emerging international standards. It also includes rules to prohibit the unauthorized receipt or distribution of encrypted satellite signals to prevent satellite television piracy.

  • Tough Penalties for Piracy and Counterfeiting: The agreement calls on South Korea to provide strong, deterrent criminal penalties against copyright piracy and trademark counterfeiting, including, for example, Internet piracy and end-user software piracy. It also calls on South Korea to criminalize unlawful camcording of movies in theaters. To strengthen enforcement procedures, the agreement authorizes the seizure, forfeiture, and destruction of counterfeit and pirated goods and the equipment used to produce them. It also permits customs officials and prosecutors to bring an IPR enforcement action without having to wait for a formal complaint from the right holders. Additionally, the agreement provides for customs enforcement against goods-in-transit, to deter violators from using ports or free trade zones to traffic in pirated products.

  • Patents & Regulated Products: The agreement ensures that the parties will provide robust patent and test data protection, while respecting the Doha Declaration on TRIPS and Public Health. Provisions include a 12-month grace period to permit inventors to publish their inventions; an adjustment of the term of a patent to compensate for certain types of delays by government agencies; protection against arbitrary revocation of patents; and an assurance that patents will be available for a broad spectrum of inventions, including plants and animals. It also fixes periods during which test data submitted to a government for the purpose of pharmaceutical or agricultural chemical product approval will be protected against unfair commercial use. The chapter incorporates provisions to ensure respect for the Doha Declaration on TRIPS and Public Health.

  • State-of-the-Art Protection for U.S. Trademarks: Under the agreement, trademark protection is extended to sound and scent marks, as well as certification marks. A system to resolve disputes about trademarks used in Internet domain names is required, which is important to prevent "cyber-squatting" with respect to high-value domain names. The principles of priority, exclusivity, and territoriality are required to be applied to trademarks and geographical indications, so that the first person who acquires a right to a trademark or geographical indication is the person who has the right to use it exclusively.