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Mexico

Mexico FlagThe North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has fostered this relationship by virtue of the agreement's comprehensive, market-opening rules. It is also creating a more equitable set of trade rules as trade barriers in Mexico are reduced and eliminated.

U.S.-Mexico Trade Facts

U.S. goods and private services trade with Mexico totaled an estimated $536 billion in 2012 (latest data available). Exports totaled $243 billion; Imports totaled $293 billion. The U.S. goods and services trade deficit with Mexico was $49 billion in 2012.

Mexico is currently our 3rd largest goods trading partner with $507 billion in total (two ways) goods trade during 2013. Goods exports totaled $226 billion; Goods imports totaled $280 billion. The U.S. goods trade deficit with Mexico was $54 billion in 2013.

Trade in private services with Mexico (exports and imports) totaled an estimated $42 billion in 2012 (latest data available). Services exports were $27 billion; Services imports were $15 billion. The U.S. services trade surplus with Mexico was $12 billion in 2012.

Exports

Mexico was the United States’ 2nd largest goods export market in 2013. 

U.S. goods exports to Mexico in 2013 were $226.2 billion, up 4.7% ($10.2 billion) from 2012, and up 132% from 2003. It is up 444% since 1993 (Pre-NAFTA). U.S. exports to Mexico accounted for 14.3% of overall U.S. exports in 2013.

The top export categories (2-digit HS) in 2013 were: Machinery ($38.5 billion), Electrical Machinery ($36.7 billion), Mineral Fuel and Oil ($23.0 billion), Vehicles ($21.6 billion), and Plastic ($15.3 billion).

U.S. exports of agricultural products to Mexico totaled $18.1 billion in 2013, the 3rd largest U.S. Ag export market. Leading categories include: corn ($1.8 billion), soybeans ($1.5 billion), dairy products ($1.4 billion), pork and pork products ($1.2 billion), and poultry meat (excluding eggs) ($1.2 billion).

U.S. exports of private commercial services* (i.e., excluding military and government) to Mexico were $27.4 billion in 2012 (latest data available), 6.8% ($1.7 billion) more than 2011 and 57% greater than 2002. It was up 163% from 2003 (Pre-NAFTA). The other private services (business, professional and technical services and financial services), and the travel categories accounted for most of U.S. services exports to Mexico.

Imports

Mexico was the United States 3rd largest supplier of goods imports in 2013. 

U.S. goods imports from Mexico totaled $280.5 billion in 2013, up 1.0% ($2.9 billion) from 2012, and up 103% from 2003. It is up 603% since 1993 (Pre-NAFTA). U.S. imports from Mexico accounted for 12.4% of overall U.S. imports in 2013.

The five largest import categories in 2013 were: Vehicles (cars, trucks and parts) ($59.6 billion), Electrical Machinery ($57.4 billion), Machinery ($42.6 billion), Mineral Fuel and Oil (crude) ($34.8 billion), and Optic and Medical Instruments ($10.7 billion).

U.S. imports of agricultural products from Mexico totaled $17.7 billion in 2013, the 2nd largest U.S. supplier. Leading categories include: fresh vegetables ($4.6 billion), fresh fruit (excluding bananas) ($3.1 billion), wine and beer ($1.9 billion), and snack foods (including chocolate) ($1.5 billion).

U.S. imports of private commercial services* (i.e., excluding military and government) from Mexico were $15.1 billion in 2012 (latest data available), up 8.8% ($1.2 billion) from 2011, and up 30% from 2002. It was up 104% from 2003 (Pre-NAFTA). Travel and other private services (business, professional, and technical services) accounted for most of U.S. services imports from Mexico in 2012.

Trade Balance

The U.S. goods trade deficit with Mexico was $54.3 billion in 2013, a 11.9% decrease ($7.3 billion) over 2012. The U.S. goods trade deficit with Mexico accounted for 7.9% of the overall U.S. goods trade deficit in 2013.

The United States had a services trade surplus of an estimated $12.2 billion with Mexico in 2012 (latest data available), up 4.4% from 2011. 

Investment

U.S. foreign direct investment (FDI) in Mexico (stock) was $101.0 billion in 2012 (latest data available), a 11.3% increase from 2011.

U.S. FDI in Mexico is primarily concentrated in the manufacturing, nonbank holding companies, and finance/insurance sectors.

Mexican FDI in the United States (stock) was $14.9 billion in 2012 (latest data available), up 14.0% from 2011. 

Mexican direct investment in the U.S. is led by the manufacturing, banking and wholesale trade sectors.

Sales of services in Mexico by majority U.S.-owned affiliates were $37.6 billion in 2011, (latest data available), while sales of services in the United States by majority Mexico-owned firms were $4.9 billion.


*NOTE: Refers to private services trade not including U.S. military sales, direct defense expenditures and other miscellaneous U.S. government services.

5/01/14

U.S.-Mexico Agreement on Lifting of Retaliatory Measures Related to the Cross-Border Trucking Dispute

U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk announced that on July 8, 2011, Mexico is expected to reduce fifty percent of its retaliatory duties on goods exported from the United States.

The MOU was signed on July 6, 2011 in Mexico City and is available here.

Letter from Ambassador Miriam Sapiro to Mexican Undersecretary for International Trade Beatríz Leycegui Gardoqui

 

Letter from Mexican Undersecretary for International Trade Beatríz Leycegui Gardoqui to Ambassador Miriam Sapiro